Washington Smoke Map

*The map above is not able to display all state air quality monitors. Click here to see all monitors in Washington: WA Ecology Air Monitors

Note: Some users might notice intermittent discrepancies in colors shown on the map of air quality monitors above, and those reported on the Department of Ecology's official page. This is because Ecology believes their method of calculating the air quality category (i.e. “Good”, “Moderate”, Unhealthy” etc) is more protective of public health in Washington. If in doubt as to which better represents public health risk, use the more stringent of the two (i.e. the map showing worse air quality).





Saturday, September 22, 2012

Guidance for Wildfire Smoke and WAQA 9-22-12 1100

Guidance for Wildfire Smoke and WAQA

WAQA: Washington Air Quality Advisory Messaging with PM2.5 values

(Created 9/22/12 interim for use in Sept/Oct 2012)

 

Definitions: 

  • PM2.5 = Particulate Matter smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter. PM2.5 is mostly made up of soot and products of incomplete combustion. These particles are so small they penetrate deep into the lungs, where they can cause serious health problems.
  • µg/m3 = micrograms of PM2.5 per cubic meter of air.

 

Guidance: Please use the chart below to interpret the colors associated with current air quality, as reported here: https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/enviwa/Default.ltr.aspx.

This color reflects 24 hr estimated exposure levels and is the most protective of human health. If the site is down, go here: http://airgraphing.pscleanair.org/.

Ecology recommends using 24hr data, but 1 hr near-real time data are available, though not color-coded as mentioned above.

 

FAQs: http://www.doh.wa.gov/CommunityandEnvironment/AirQuality/OutdoorAir/SmokeFromFires.aspx

INFO Clearing House: http://wasmoke.blogspot.com/

The U.S. Forest Service runs some temporary monitors: http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/smoke.pl. Time is listed in GMT. To convert to local time, subtract 8 hrs, or contact Rick Graw with the USFS at rgraw@fs.fed.us.

 

Health Category

 

PM 2.5 ug/m3

 

Advice

Good

0 to 13

None

 

 

Moderate

 

 

14 to 20

Some people with lung and heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or a current respiratory infection may be sensitive to air pollution at this level and should consider limiting outdoor activity.

 

 

Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups

 

 

21 to 35

People with lung and heart disease, stroke, diabetes or a current respiratory infection, infants, children, and older adults should limit outdoor activity.

 

 

Unhealthy

 

 

36 to 80

Everyone should try and limit outdoor activity. If possible, people with lung and heart disease, stroke, or respiratory infections, infants, children, and older adults should stay indoors.

 

 

Very Unhealthy

 

 

81 to 135

Everyone should try to stay inside. People with lung and heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or a current respiratory infection should limit indoor activity levels. Shut windows and doors if it is not too hot. Set home air conditioners on the recirculate mode if this is available.

 

 

Hazardous

 

 

>135

Everyone should try to stay indoors. Limit physical activity. Shut windows and doors if it is not too hot. Set home air conditioners on the recirculate mode if this is available. If it is too hot to shut windows and doors, consider leaving the area until air quality improves. Operators of larger, nonresidential buildings should check with HVAC specialists to determine the best course of action.

 

 

 

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