Washington Smoke Map

*The map above is not able to display all state air quality monitors. Click here to see all monitors in Washington: WA Ecology Air Monitors

Note: Some users might notice intermittent discrepancies in colors shown on the map of air quality monitors above, and those reported on the Department of Ecology's official page. This is because Ecology believes their method of calculating the air quality category (i.e. “Good”, “Moderate”, Unhealthy” etc) is more protective of public health in Washington. If in doubt as to which better represents public health risk, use the more stringent of the two (i.e. the map showing worse air quality).





AIR QUALITY NOW

Monitors
Interactive map of air monitoring locations in Washington


More Info
For Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Washington’s air monitoring network follow these steps once you are on the state’s air monitoring page:



These monitors are deployed only as needed during major smoke incidents.  

Local and national air quality website by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 

Nationwide conditions.  If there is a big smoke incident in Washington, you may find it here.

20 comments:

  1. Why doesn't the air quality map on the main page match the 'air quality now' tab?

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    1. This question, written on July 6, was answered below.

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  2. Are you referring to the map that's available at the first link on this page above? The fortress.wa.gov one? We get the map that we display on the main page of the blog directly from the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). EPA has developed a nationally applicable scale to warn the public about health effects from air pollution - the Air Quality Index or AQI. Health professionals in Washington developed a warning scale that they feel is more protective of public health and here it's called the WAQA (rather than AQI). There's a little note right below the map we display on the blog that advises people to go with the more precautionary level if the two maps differ. Great question, thanks.

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  3. Smoke has moved into the Deer Lake area and there is a thick haze. Do you know where the smoke is coming from?

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  4. I'm sorry I didn't see your question yesterday. There is certainly a lot of smoke visible in your area on the satellite image but it's kind of hard to tell where it's coming from. The I-90 Sprague fire made a pretty big run yesterday so that would be my best guess (check the map on the most recent blog post for fire locations from this morning's briefing).

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  5. The Wenatchee monitor station appears to be down. Will someone repair it?
    https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/enviwa/StationInfo.aspx?ST_ID=152

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  6. There is a technician working on the site in Wenatchee. Hopefully it will be up shortly.

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  7. Overheard some FS personal yesterday in the Methow Valley that there was actually 15 active wildfires in around the valley and most of them were being kept from the public. Any logical reason for this?

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  8. We are hoping to take the kids camping at the Red Mountain Campground this weekend. It's on the road to Salmon la Sac. Do you have any idea what the air quality is right now? I am having a hard time determining the risk.

    Thank you!

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  9. You can find the current AQ conditions on the mapping portion of this blog or at Ecology's website here https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/enviwa/Default.ltr.aspx The map on the blog will show you any temporary monitors that have been placed due to wildfire activity. You can also find current wildfires on the map. Next you will have to look at the forecast for where you are camping and determine it's proximity to the current fires and the forecasted winds from the current fires. If the winds are forecasted to blow out of the West and there are no large fires West of you may be ok. But remember kids breathe way more air by volume than we do, about 4x more when they are running around so I'd check with the nearest hosted campground or Ranger Station before you go to get some on the ground perspective. But remember with these large scale fires things change fast and smoke travels a long ways. Yesterday in Yakima is was in the Unhealthy range and by the time the sun set it was back to good so things change fast! If your really worried about health related issues consult with your Doctor. Good luck!

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  10. Does anyone know why the air monitors at Ellensburg, & Wenatchee, have been taken offline? It seems that when they would be of most value, they are not available.

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  11. Morton was horrible today & tonight with smoke & ash & I am guessing that it will be again tomorrow. How are we suppose to know just how bad it is outside or how safe it is or how long it should last or what precautions to take or if or when anyone should leave? No one reports on our area and we need to know when its happening not way after the fact... if at all !!! There are no monitors in our area so I would think in a case such as this that there would be people traveling to areas or stationed in areas to monitor it !! Something for GODS sake!!

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  12. We live in Whatcom County, close to Bellingham. There is a fire on Vancouver Island. The winds have blown the smoke over our area. Since we live in a valley, it seems stuck here. We cannot open our windows or go outside. According to the air quality map, we are supposed to be green, or good. Perhaps the EPA can get out from behind there desks, go outside, take a breath of air.....then tell us if the air quality is "good".

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  13. The smell of smoke is very strong in Bellevue at the moment.

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  14. It is really smokey here in Arlington. Is this from the fires in eastern Washington?

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  15. I imagine the smoke smell is gone from Arlington by now with all the wind and rain. The smoke may have been from the Jumbo fire which is (or was) burning outside of Darrington on Jumbo Mountain although it should have gotten a pretty good dousing from the rain.

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  16. I live in Ellensburg. I have been closely monitoring the numbers provided by the smoke monitor, and correlating them with how my body feels or reacts to the various conditions. I suppose that I am probably considered to be one of those who is hyper sensitive. But with that mentioned, I have noticed that often, numbers from about 38 on up, including the upper range of the "Good" category, will often correlate with conditions which result in a significant burning eyes type syndrome. This may not translate to a health problem, but it surely results in discomfort. Sometimes, headaches also occur.

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    1. Thank you for your comment we have received similar questions with regards to confusion on plugging the actual pollution measurements into the WAQA index scale. We've updated the Ecology Ambient Air Monitoring site with a Useful Information tab where you may find some helpful guidance to answer this and other questions. Look under the FAQ tabs here https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/enviwa/Default.htm To answer your questions directly you may be plugging the actual pollution values measured and displayed in micrograms per cubic meter of air (ug/m3) that you can find when you select the link for View Site Information after clicking on the Ellensburg Monitor. You said you experience burning eyes from about 38 on up. I suspect this is the actual measured 1 hour ug/m3 value. You shouldn't plug that value into the WAQA scale that has an index value distribution of Good 1-50 Moderate 50-100 Unhealthy for sensitive Groups101-150 Unhealthy 151-200 Very Unhealthy 201-300 and Hazardous 301-500. These index values are not raw pollution values and the WAQA health advisory scale is used for different types of pollution depending on what the device is measuring. For Smoke, most air monitor devices are measuring small particle pollution known as PM 2.5. Here are the index Ranges for PM 2.5 based on a 24 hour avg of the actual measured pollution. Good 0-12, Moderate13-20, Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups 21-35, Unhealthy 36-80, Very Unhealthy 81-135, Hazardous Greater than 135 ug/m3. The health advice for these WAQA categories was based on most recent research from 24hour exposure levels so I caution you against plugging a 1 hr value into this chart but if you were looking at a 24hr avg of 38 ug/m3 that would put the warning category into the Unhealthy group which would explain the burning eyes you are feeling. Hope this helps.

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  17. Sean, thanks for the information. That makes a lot more sense.

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