Washington Smoke Map

*The map above is not able to display all state air quality monitors. Click here to see all monitors in Washington: WA Ecology Air Monitors

Note: Some users might notice intermittent discrepancies in colors shown on the map of air quality monitors above, and those reported on the Department of Ecology's official page. This is because Ecology believes their method of calculating the air quality category (i.e. “Good”, “Moderate”, Unhealthy” etc) is more protective of public health in Washington. If in doubt as to which better represents public health risk, use the more stringent of the two (i.e. the map showing worse air quality).





Monday, August 29, 2016

Air Quality Advisory - Leavenworth, Peshastin, Cashmere, Wenatchee, and E. Wenatchee

The air quality monitors in the Leavenworth and Wenatchee area are currently registering as “Unhealthy for Sensitive People” and “Moderate” due to smoke from the Suncrest Fire.  According to Department of Ecology the smoke is expected to continue to disperse throughout the day and re-build tonight, but to lower amounts.  The Leavenworth and Wenatchee area is expected to have “Moderate” to “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups” air quality through Wednesday.

 

Smoke conditions vary as fire activity and winds change and as smoke moves through the community.  Individuals should take the following precautions if you are affected by the smoke:

·         Check local air quality reports and listen to news or health warnings for your community.

·         Avoid physical exertion.

·         Stay indoors and keep indoor air as clean as possible.  Take the following steps when indoors:

o    Keep windows and doors closed.  If there is no air conditioning and it is too hot to keep windows and doors closed, consider leaving the area.

o    Run an air conditioner (if you have one), set it to re-circulate and close the fresh-air intake.  Make sure to change the filter regularly.

o    Use a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to reduce indoor air pollution. 

o    Don’t add indoor pollution.  Don’t use candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves.  Don’t vacuum, because vacuuming stirs up particles already inside your home.  Don’t smoke, because smoking puts even more pollution into the air.

o    Some room air cleaners can help remove smoke particles indoors.  More information on air cleaners is available at: www.arb.ca.gov/research/indoor/acdsumm.pdf.

·         If you must be outdoors during smoke events, wear an N-95 respirator mask.

·         If you have asthma or other lung diseases, make sure you follow your doctor’s directions about taking your medicines and follow your asthma management plan.  Call your health care provider if your symptoms worsen.

 

Short-term symptoms from smoke exposure may include dizziness, headache, difficulty breathing, coughing, excessive phlegm, and nausea.  For specific medical advice please contact your physician.

 

Resources

Chelan-Douglas Health District Air Quality and Fires Webpage: www.cdhd.wa.gov

The latest air quality information is available from the Washington Smoke Information site at: wasmoke.blogspot.com.

To get updates on the Suncrest Fire, visit InciWeb at: inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4998

Category

Health Effects

General Precautions

Good

None

None

Moderate

People with pre-existing heart and lung diseases may begin to have breathing problems.

People with asthma, respiratory infection, diabetes, lung or heart disease, or have had a stroke should limit outdoor activities.

Unhealthy for sensitive people

Increasing likelihood of adverse health effects for those with pre-existing heart and lung diseases.

People with heart or lung disease, asthma, diabetes, infants, children, adults older than 65, pregnant women, or who have had a stroke should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.

Unhealthy

Increased aggravation of pre-existing heart and lung diseases and premature mortality among sensitive populations.  Increasing adverse respiratory effects in general population.

Everyone should limit prolonged exertion.  People with asthma, respiratory infection, diabetes, lung or heart disease, or have had a stroke, infants, children, pregnant women, and adults over 65 should limit time spent outdoors and avoid prolonged exertion.

Very Unhealthy

Significant aggravation of pre-existing heart and lung diseases and premature mortality among sensitive populations.  Significant increase of adverse respiratory effects in the general population.

Everyone should stay indoors, do only light activities, and keep windows closed if it is not too hot.  If you must be outdoors, wear an N-95 respirator mask.  People with asthma, lung and heart disease, or have had a stroke should avoid any outdoor activity or relocate to a “clean-air” area.

Hazardous

Serious aggravation of pre-existing heart and lung diseases. Increased pre-mature mortality among sensitive populations.  Serious risk of adverse respiratory affects in the general population.

Everyone should avoid any outdoor exertion, remain indoors, or if possible relocate to a “clean-air” area.  If you must be outdoors, wear an N-95 respirator mask.

 

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